How Coffee Seasons Work

by Zoe Maiden March 18, 2019 2 min read

How Coffee Seasons Work

     Much like any other crop, there is a prime season for harvesting coffee. I will not go into all of the details of the coffee plant (that may wait for another blog post), but when the plant grows to maturity, it will yield a cluster of fruit. Also referred to as cherries, these fruit clusters are initially green and then ripen into a beautiful shade of red similar to a cherry. Within the cherries is a pulp and two oval-shaped beans that once harvested, processed, and roasted become the coffee beans we know and love. 

     In most countries, coffee beans are harvested once per year. There are some countries, such as Kenya and Colombia, that experience favorable climates all year long so smaller secondary crops (also known as fly crops) are harvested. It is essential that only the ripest cherries are plucked. The more mature the cherry is at harvesting, the more flavorful and less acidic the coffee bean. It can take 2-3 months for a cherry to ripen fully. 

     Right now I am talking to my bean importer about their current selections. This is an exciting, yet stressful time because I want to make sure I offer the best variety, both in origin and processing. This is the time I find out which coffees I need to say goodbye to (due to a bad crop season or overstocked inventory) and the new ones I get to cup and introduce to you. You can read why I lose sleep over this process, here.

     Stay tuned as new coffees will be making an appearance as I sample this year's crops!

Zoe Maiden
Zoe Maiden



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Coffee Grinds Explained

We currently offer 4 different coffee grind levels.  Listed below with descriptions.

Whole Bean: Unground coffee for a home grinder.

Coarse: Think sugar in the raw, maybe more coarse, recommended for Chemex Brewer, French Press, Cold Brew

Medium: Slightly coarser than table salt, recommended for Metal Kone filters, Flat bottom brewers including Kalitta, Cloth filters

Fine:  Slightly finer than table salt, recommended for V60 pour overs, Cone filter coffee pots, Moka Pot, Aeropress.

Extra Fine: Like powdered sugar, recommended for Espresso.

If at all possible, we recommend grinding at home. We prefer Baratza coffee grinders and offer several of their models for sale. Click here to shop for one of their brewers.